Nathan

Fundamentals of Art

If you’ve spent much time in the art world, you’ve probably heard of “the fundamentals” and how important they are. Over the years I have studied how making art actually works and how to accurately define the many components. “Why is this useful?” By breaking a skill into its individual parts, you can practice each one more intentionally. Trying to learn everything at once or with a vague focus can make it harder to recognize your progress. For someone trying to master their craft, having a solid comprehension of the tools available is important.

The result of my efforts is the Fundamentals of Art document that I am now offering for free download on my Subscribe page. You can get your copy now.

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Victory Bunny

A client commissioned me to create a victory illustration to be shown when a player wins a solitaire card game. Bonus points if you can find all the hidden suits 😀 ♦ ♣ ♥ ♠.

Victory Bunny by Nathan Parkinson, Digital, Jun 2024

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The Astounding Work of Nicholas Rougeux: Data Artist

Artists, scholars, naturalists . . . prepare to drool. Nicholas Rougeux – expert data visualizer – has taken the incredible works of historical artists and made them effortlessly accessible in an online format. Below I have highlighted his projects that have most captured my fascination.

ICONOGRAPHIC ENCYCLOPÆDIA of SCIENCE, LITERATURE, and ART

Discover a vast array of knowledge from 1851 spanning Zoology, Military Sciences, Architecture, Mathematics, and so much more, beautifully depicted by over 13,000 illustrations. The image quality is exquisite and the web-friendly formatting has interwoven the text with the pictures for seamless referencing.

British & Exotic Mineralogy

You’ve probably never experienced rocks in this way before. Artistically arranged by colour this collection of high-resolution illustrations makes my mouth water: highly educational and inspirational.

ILLUSTRATIONS of the NATURAL ORDERS of PLANTS

Soak in 160 beautiful illustrations of a wide variety of plants, ordered and interconnected in a gorgeous collection.

Humming-Birds

Nicholas presents John Gould’s 537 species of humming-bird illustrations in mesmerising swarms of lively colour. Prepare to get lost in the intricate details of these delicate beauties.

Mathematical Instruments

This is a smaller project, but still beautiful and stimulating, especially the posters. I love looking at each of the instruments in their groups. I’m a sucker for gadgets of antiquity.

Please also visit Nicholas’s main website to see more of his mastery: https://www.c82.net/. Each project has comprehensive posters that make great wall art.

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Karl Kopinski’s Thoughts on Photorealism

The skilled artist Karl Kopinski did a livestream with Proko discussing his character design process and answering viewers’ questions. At the end of the stream a very interesting question was addressed, essentially, “At what point as an artist do you stop striving for photorealism and embrace your own style?”

Character Design Process with Karl Kopinski (LIVESTREAM)

My Summary

  • Part of your development as an artist is recognizing what you do well that makes you unique and interesting, and not always striving for photorealism: your strength might be line quality, lighting, etc.
  • As you gain years of experience, simplify your art and engage the viewer by letting them do some of the work; like style, it’s not something that can be forced or else it looks contrived; it requires confidence in your abilities.
  • You don’t always have to prove you’re amazing at what you do; there’s always someone better than you; tell your story in your way.

Here’s a few pieces of art from Karl’s website.

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Daniel 1: Pulse and Water

This is the fifth and final illustration for the book of Daniel chapter 1 from the Bible.

See the complete collection: Faith in Captivity.

God granted Daniel favour with his master and the boys were served vegetables and water for a ten day test. Appearing fairer and stronger than the others, their diet was changed permanently and they joyfully ate the food of faith.

Pulse and Water by Nathan Parkinson, Digital, Mar 2024

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Daniel 1: Meat and Wine

This is the fourth of five illustrations for the book of Daniel chapter 1 from the Bible.

See the complete collection: Faith in Captivity.

The pagan king offered the boys flesh of the fattest beasts, his own choice wine, and the finest dainties Babylon could produce, but Daniel purposed in his heart not to defile himself with these temptations.

Meat and Wine by Nathan Parkinson, Digital, Feb 2024

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Daniel 1: Israel’s Captivity

This is the third of five illustrations for the book of Daniel chapter 1 from the Bible.

See the complete collection: Faith in Captivity.

For Israel’s disobedience God allowed their enemies to enslave them. The Babylonians were wicked and did not fear the God of heaven and earth. King Nebuchadnezzar conquered with power and pride.

Israel’s Captivity by Nathan Parkinson, Digital, Jan 2024

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Daniel 1: Before the King

This is the second of five illustrations for the book of Daniel chapter 1 from the Bible.

See the complete collection: Faith in Captivity.

After the time of preparation the king asked the boys many difficult questions, and in every area they were found to be ten times wiser than all the king’s counsellors. God had richly blessed their faithful obedience.

Before the King by Nathan Parkinson, Digital, Sep 2023

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Greg “Craola” Simkins’ Artistic Process

The quality of Greg Simkins’ work makes me want to be more diligent (i.e. get focused on making more art and not waste time looking at reference or doing lower-priority things).

“Innovation is saying ‘No’ to 1,000 things.” – Steve Jobs

I aspire to create as freely as Greg does; though, I don’t feel drawn to be so “Dalí” or cryptically symbolic. Watching him paint in video form is awe-inspiring. I found the following conversation on YouTube of him with a couple other artists; he goes into some exciting detail about his creative process; I’ll jump to that spot in the following link:

Shop Talk with Greg Simkins & Tony Curanaj – Moderator Natalia Fabia – Host Trekell Art Supplies

I especially enjoyed the second half of the first hour of this video.

I’d love to show some of his pieces here, but he asks people not to reproduce his work without permission; so while I wait to hear back from him, go check out his website and YouTube channel for more golden art and advice.

Edit: I got permission to feature some of Craola’s art! Thank you to Greg’s team.

Piper Pass by Greg Simkins

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Major System Peg Words (Memory Tool)

This post is generally unrelated to art, but it features an extremely useful and versatile tool for remembering anything – the Major System peg words (see my full PDF list below). The Major System is a mnemonic technique which encodes numbers as consonant sounds (or in this case, groups of similar sounds); the consonants are mixed with vowels to form words; the resulting words serve as mental pegs upon which to hang (i.e. associate) things you want to remember. The following list is an example:

  • 0 – zoo (s,z)
  • 1 – tie (t,d)
  • 2 – Noah (n)
  • 3 – ma (m)
  • 4 – rye (r)
  • 5 – law (l)
  • 6 – shoe (sh,ch,j)
  • 7 – cow (c)
  • 8 – ivy (v,f)
  • 9 – bee (b,p)
  • 10 – toes

Using Peg Words

To use peg words for memorization, first learn the numbers with their sounds; then use the sounds to memorize a word list. Next create a mental association between each item from the list you want to memorize with the corresponding peg word. In your mind see the two items interacting in a bizarre, memorable way – in doing so you are hanging the item on the peg for later retrieval. Mentally-visually associating two things is the most effective way to remember something easily because it takes advantage of how the mind optimally works. This system enables you to memorize lists and recall the exact numbered position of every item in the list.

This system is very useful for memorizing passages of Scripture (even entire chapters and books) as you can create and recall an association for the beginning of each verse and link it to the peg word for that verse number. This association acts as a prompt for starting the verse.

Why the Major System?

I first learned of peg words from The Memory Book by Harry Lorayne and Jerry Lucas (this book is a fantastic resource for all things memory-related). You may be asking, “Why go through all the trouble of learning a whole memory system when I can use something more simple like one-bun, two-shoe, three-tree, etc. to accomplish the same thing?” The answer is extensibility. If you only want to memorize a short list of ten items, then more simple systems are great; but what if you want to memorize 50 or 100 or an undetermined number of things? Rhyming, alphabet, and other small-scale systems are limited in their scope. Using the Major System makes expanding your word list relatively easy by providing a predictable, consistent system which allows you to move between number and sound with ease (once you’ve memorized it and practiced, of course).

Peg Word List

I’ve created a compact printout for the first 100 peg words. I started with a word list from this source (which also has a great explanation of using the Major System), and then changed some words to fit my taste. The following PDF printout contains the peg word list in a compact format four times; so you can cut the page into four sections to create bookmarks or share with others. I hope the PDF is useful.

More about the Major System

Learn more about the Major System:

You may find the following website helpful in creating your own Major System peg word list: pinfruit.com.

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Tim Mcburnie’s Strategy For Learning To Draw

Learning to draw is an endless journey. I’m always looking to improve my approach and mindset regarding how to learn and produce most efficiently. Tim Mcburnie’s advice on the subject resonated with me, and I love the quality of his art. Watch his video through the following link:

Best Strategy For Learning To Draw? Endless Studies Are Not The Answer… (YouTube)

What I took away

  • Your need for the art fundamentals depends on what art you want to make. Many current pros just drew a lot without focusing on fundamentals.
  • Follow an applied fundamentals approach: decide what art you want to make and spend most of your time making it while building your foundational knowledge and skills to support that.
  • Apply foundational concepts ASAP! Doing endless studies and exercises just helps you get good at exercises. What’s most important is to understand how to integrate/apply the knowledge gained from an exercise or study into your workflow, how you can actually use it to help make art.
  • Exercises are largely an academic approach; once you understand the techniques/ideas, you can skip doing exercises and apply them directly to your work.

Did I mention I love the quality of his art? 😉

Please do check out his website and YouTube channel.

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